Lulu's bookshelf: read

MWF Seeking BFF: My Yearlong Search For A New Best Friend
Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir
Bossypants
Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?
Bringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting
My Boyfriend Wrote a Book About Me: And Other Stories I Shouldn't Share with Acquaintances, Coworkers, Taxi drivers, Assistants, Job Interviewers, Bikini Waxers, and Ex/Current/Future Boyfriends but Have
Paris in Love
Jeneration X: One Reluctant Adult's Attempt to Unarrest Her Arrested Development; Or, Why It's Never Too Late for Her Dumb Ass to Learn Why Froot Loops Are Not for Dinner
I Suck at Girls
The End of Your Life Book Club
Life As I Blow It: Tales Of Love, Life & Sex . . . Not Necessarily In That Order
I Don't Care About Your Band: Lessons Learned from Indie Rockers, Trust Funders, Pornographers, Felons, Faux-Sensitive Hipsters, and Other Guys I've Dated
The Diary of a Young Girl
Almost French: Love and a New Life in Paris
Paris to the Moon
Sixty Million Frenchmen Can't Be Wrong
I'll Never Be French (no matter what I do): Living in a Small Village in Brittany
Entre Nous: A Woman's Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl
The Gospel According to Coco Chanel: Life Lessons from the World's Most Elegant Woman
The Sartorialist


Lulu's favorite books »
elbesoie:

Coffee (by julie marie craig)

Happy 1st Birthday, Prince George!
"There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed"

— Happy birthday Ernest Hemingway, b. on this day in 1899 (via penamerican)

"I am learning every day to allow the space between where I am and where I want to be to inspire me and not terrify me."

— Tracee Ellis Ross (via wordsthat-speak)

(via quasifesto)

explore-blog:

For Hemingway’s birthday, his timeless advice to aspiring writers

explore-blog:

For Hemingway’s birthday, his timeless advice to aspiring writers

smartgirlsattheparty:

nationalbook:

50 BookBench sculptures have been installed throughout London, in conjunction with a study from the National Literacy Trust that shows the number of young people who enjoy reading is on the rise.

(Via The Bookseller)

If you see these IRL, tag us in a photo!

sweetheartsandcharacters:

R.I.P James Garner (April 7, 1928-July 19, 2014).

(Source: imdb.com)

maseashford asked: Noah Czerny or Étienne St. Clair

(Source: dreammetheworld, via friscolibrary)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

One of my all-time favorites.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

One of my all-time favorites.

yareadersml:

New from J.K. Rowling: Dumbledore’s Army Reunites At Quidditch World Cup Final

This came out today!  The short story will be available July 31st!!!!

Be still, my heart. 

(Source: princessmowgli, via greeneteens)

artnet:

Happy Bastille Day mes petits! 
Roy Lichtenstein, Crak! 

artnet:

Happy Bastille Day mes petits! 

Roy Lichtenstein, Crak! 

americastestkitchen:

Happy Bastille Day! We think this holiday is the perfect excuse to bake a few classic French desserts. We’ve mastered the art of Profiteroles, Croissants, and Crepes—which recipe will you try first?
Profiteroles: http://bit.ly/1kW3KuoCroissants: http://bit.ly/W4nFljCrepes with Sugar and Lemon: http://bit.ly/1kW42S0

americastestkitchen:

Happy Bastille Day! We think this holiday is the perfect excuse to bake a few classic French desserts. We’ve mastered the art of Profiteroles, Croissants, and Crepes—which recipe will you try first?

Profiteroles: http://bit.ly/1kW3Kuo
Croissants: http://bit.ly/W4nFlj
Crepes with Sugar and Lemon: http://bit.ly/1kW42S0

todaysdocument:

Thomas Jefferson’s Account of the Storming of the Bastille, 225 Years ago:

“…in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken.”
Letter from Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Minister to France, to John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, July 19, 1789, reporting on the events in Paris, (page 538)
From the file unit:  Letters from Thomas Jefferson, 1785 - 1789

Appointed U.S. Minister to France in 1785, Thomas Jefferson was in Paris in July 1789 when the French people rose up against their rulers and the first blood was shed in the opening days of the French Revolution. In his letter to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, Jefferson recounts how a mob stormed the Bastille, took the stash of arms, freed the prisoners, and seized the “Governor” of the Bastille who was then killed and beheaded in the city streets on July 14, 1789.
via Eyewitness: Thomas Jefferson - Onset of the French Revolution, 1789

todaysdocument:

Thomas Jefferson’s Account of the Storming of the Bastille, 225 Years ago:

“…in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken.”

Letter from Thomas Jefferson, U.S. Minister to France, to John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, July 19, 1789, reporting on the events in Paris, (page 538)

From the file unit:  Letters from Thomas Jefferson, 1785 - 1789

Appointed U.S. Minister to France in 1785, Thomas Jefferson was in Paris in July 1789 when the French people rose up against their rulers and the first blood was shed in the opening days of the French Revolution. In his letter to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, Jefferson recounts how a mob stormed the Bastille, took the stash of arms, freed the prisoners, and seized the “Governor” of the Bastille who was then killed and beheaded in the city streets on July 14, 1789.

via Eyewitness: Thomas Jefferson - Onset of the French Revolution, 1789

epicreads:

booksandhotchocolate:

Book Nerd Problems | Lending Books to Friends

I want to marry you for making these GIFs.

Pretty much.

(via thefirststraw)